IMPACT OF IT REVOLUTION ON MICROFINANCE INSTITUTIONS IN INDIA

Author: Dr. Ambika Bhatia Associate Professor, Punjabi University Regional Centre for Information Technology and Management, Mohali. Chhavi Kiran Junior Research Fellow, Punjabi University Regional Centre for Information Technology and Management, Mohali

Microfinance is a source of financial services for people lacking access or without full access to the financial sector. Microfinance enables them to take out loans to build or expand businesses and to make savings deposits. RBI defines microfinance as the provision of thrift, credit and other financial services and products of very small amounts to the poor in rural, semi-urban and urban areas for enabling them to raise their income levels and improve their standards of living. The microfinance industry has made good progress in improving understanding about issues related to institutional performance. For further enhancing the performance of MFIs technology can and has been acting as a catalyst for the delivery of multiple services

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The Prize of Having Big Size, Debt and Equity Related To Profitability: An Empirical Analysis

Author: Amit Kumar (Department of Business Administration, University of Lucknow.) Dr. Shailesh Kumar Kaushal (Department of Business Administration, University of Lucknow.)

It is difficult to have an ecumenical mix of debt to equity ratio which can be applied everywhere. Some practitioners have also contended that the growth firm should use a greater amount of equity finance. Companies often focus on the different costs and benefits associated with debt and equity mix while selecting their capital structures. Whenever the topic of the debt to equity is discussed, the optimal capital structure is presented as a solution or an appropriate capital structure. But the point of optimality has also been questioned in recent years and further there is no model to select an optimal capital structure. Since the optimal capital structure which has been selected this year would not remain optimal capital structure for all the time and if the economy enters into a recession in any year, the companies having more debt to equity find themselves burdened with debt.

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Agro-Based Units in Varanasi: Ethical Issues & Remedial Measures

Author: ANUJ GUPTA (RESEARCH SCHOLAR (SRF)) FACULTY OF COMMERCE BANARAS HINDU UNIVERSITY

India is the country where 56.60 % of population (both male & female) is engaged in agriculture (main labours, as per census 2001), but growth of agro-based units is not much more than average level. India is among top three global producers of many crops like wheat, rice, etc. With such a vast & rich background, India is suffering in the growth & development of agro-based units. The units which are agro-based are tiny, micro or small-scale, in most of the cities. Only handful of such type of units may be medium or large-scale. The condition in the city, Varanasi, too is not very good. There are 237 units engaged as agro-based units employing 906 workers & about 223 million rupees. In the era of customer satisfaction & brand building; business ethics is becoming a popular tool of growth & development of any business or profession. Most of the western & European countries are following ethical practices in business from decades (1976 onwards). But in India it is still at the debate topic, “WHETHER ETHICAL-MOTIVE OR PROFIT-MOTIVE?” Various issues have been found in the recent past on the path of business ethics & agro-based units. All these issues are grabbed from various entrepreneurs & agro-consumers. The ethical issues & their remedial measures are also grabbed from them in this study. The study will help in overcoming such practical problems faced by the agro-based units.

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Towards Electronic Payment Interoperability: A Reflection

Author: Arpita Baijal PhD student, RA Podar College, The University of Mumbai Dr. Vinita Pimpale R.A. Podar College, ELC- O classification

Payment Systems is a system to settle the financial transactions by paying consideration for goods and services. Payment systems have evolved over time from primitive to most advanced forms towards interoperability. In older times, barter system was prevalent where goods and services were bought and sold in exchange of other goods and services. This system of payment had its own draw backs as it was difficult to find a person who wants to exchange the same good or service as desired by the other person. Slowly and steadily over the years with the innovation in payment system new solutions have been designed. These sophisticated systems are more convenient and safe to settle transactions.

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Exploring ‘Make in India’ Campaign & Emerging FDI trends in IT& BPM Sector in India

Author: Ashutosh D. Gaur Doctoral Scholar Dr Jasmin Padiya Associate Professor R.A. Podar College, ELC- O classification

A plethora of article has documented on Foreign direct investment (FDI). This literature cover in depth analysis of trends of FDI in India after the Make in India Program initiated by government of India, focus on global present scenario on Foreign direct investment (FDI) and study of China’s policy to attract Investments are the core framework of it. India’s core strengths are skilled man power, developed financial system, sound regulatory regimes and long history of private sector made it the prime destination for foreign direct investment FDI. India can attract far more FDI by creating world class infrastructure, creating conducive labour, Intellectual property right and land acquisition laws for business. Recent initiative of government has improved India’s rank on ease of doing business. Gujarat has attracted more FDI than Chain’s sate is evidence of it.

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Price Reaction of Indian Banking Stocks to the sector specific Shocks

Author: MANTHA JAYA VARDHANI MBA , Amrtita School of Business, kasavanahalli, Carmelaram post, Bangalore,

Over the years banks have been a driving force in establishing a sound financial sector in India. The origin of Banks in India can be traced back to 1921 when imperial bank (former name of SBI) was established. Later RBI the regulating body was established in 1935. Indian banking sector is classified into scheduled and non-scheduled banks and consists of 26 public sector banks, 20 private sector banks, 43 foreign banks, 56 regional rural banks, 1,589 urban cooperative banks and 93,550 rural cooperative banks, in addition to cooperative credit institutions. Indian banking sector is a well-organized and well-regulated sector, which monitors the economic and financial activities.

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Fostering Innovation in Financial Inclusion: Study on the Emerging Microfinance Business Model of Cooperatives Banks

Author:Naveen Kumar K and Sarita Bhatnagar National Institute of Bank Management, Pune, India

Rural cooperative banking and credit Institutions are instrumental in meeting the growing credit needs of rural India. Historically, cooperatives are an institutional mechanism to deliver credit services to small borrowers at an affordable cost and to address the dual issues of rural credit market - indebtedness and poverty. Through more than 100 years of its existence, rural credit cooperatives have occupied a unique place in the rural credit delivery system with outstanding growth in geographical and demographic outreach and volume of business. They are the conventional and local-based institutions which have facilitated financial inclusion in India.

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STUDYING INEQUALITY AMONG THE BRICS NATIONS

Author:Ninawari Dilip Ware Research Assistant

BRICS consist of five major economies Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa. These countries are home to a major chunk of the world population. And contribute to 30% of the world GDP. But in spite of this the inequality in these five countries is also very rampant. The term BRICS was termed in 2001 in a paper named "The world needs better economic BRIC. The formal grouping was made in 2006. It was in 2010, that South Africa joined the group. The original aim of these nations was to change the inequality scenario in the international relations. Apart from this the BRICS organisation could be seen and followed by other developing economies.

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Environmental Economics Key Sectors and Carbon Hot Spots in Indian Economy

Author : Priyanka Tariyal Junior Research Consultant, National Human Rights Commission, GPO Complex, INA,

In any economy all goods and services produced are directly and/or indirectly associated with energy-use and, according to the type of fuel utilized, with CO2 (Carbon dioxide) emissions as well. For a developing economy like India, its contribution to historical emissions of GHG gases of anthropogenic nature is hardly 4% and its per capita emissions are still amongst the lowest in the world (Planning commission 2011) but still, it is a significant contributor of greenhouse gases (GHGs) in the atmosphere.

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AN STUDY OF METAMORPHOSIS OF VENTURE CAPITAL FINANCING IN INDIAN FINANCIAL MARKET

Author : Saurabh Pandey Research Scholar, Faculty of Commerce, Banaras Hindu University

Venture capital is financing that investors provide to startup companies and small businesses that are believed to have long-term growth potential. For startups without access to capital markets, venture capital is an essential source of money. Risk is typically high for investors, but the downside for the startup is that these venture capitalists usually get a say in company decisions. Venture capital is long-term risk capital to finance high technology projects which involve risk but at the same time has strong potential for growth. Venture capitalist pools their resources including managerial abilities to assist new entrepreneurs in the early years of the project. Once the project the stage of profitability, they sell their equity holding at a high premium. Therefore venture capital providing company is form of financing institution which joins as entrepreneur as a co-promoter in a project and share the risk and rewards of the enterprise.

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PRODUCTIVITY AS BASE OF ECONOMIC GROWTH OF MEMEBR NATIONS OF SAARC

Author : SHRI PRAKASH AND SONIA ANAND DHIR

The member countries of South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC) possess similar political, socio–cultural, demographic and economic characteristics. These features, along with the fact that they are neighboring countries, have been one of the main reasons for the formation of this association in 1985. Since then the association has been moving up towards a stronger economic integration by means of Agreements on Preferential Trading in 1993 (SAARC Preferential Trading Arrangement-SAPTA) to the signing of more recent Free Trade Agreement in 2004(South Asian Free Trade Area—SAFTA).

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DETERMINING FACTORS AFFECTING DEFECATION AND HEALTH & ECONOMIC IMPACT OF SANITATION PRACTICES: CASE STUDY OF URBAN SLUMS IN DELHI

Author : SRISHTI DIXIT

WHO (2008) states that 10% of the total global burden of diseases can be averted by making sanitation, water and hygiene related improvements including 1.4 million avertable diarrheal deaths every year. Highest burden of such diseases falls upon less developed nations. While it is important to quantify the burden of disease, it is also crucial to understand what factors lead to such prevalent use of open defecation and improper hygiene. Such factors may vary geographically, culturally, politically. In our study we focus on urban population of national capital of India. In India diarrhea is reportedly the third largest cause of child mortality and causes a whopping 13% of child deaths each year (NCBI 2015).

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A STUDY ON THE IMPACT OF GROSS DOMESTIC SAVINGS AND GROSS CAPITAL FORMATION ON THE GROSS DOMESTIC PRODUCT IN INDIA

Author : Sudharsana Reddy. Pujari, Dr. Muthugopalakrishnan, Dr. Mammilla Rajasekhar

WHO (2008) states that 10% of the total global burden of diseases can be averted by making sanitation, water and hygiene related improvements including 1.4 million avertable diarrheal deaths every year. Highest burden of such diseases falls upon less developed nations. While it is important to quantify the burden of disease, it is also crucial to understand what factors lead to such prevalent use of open defecation and improper hygiene. Such factors may vary geographically, culturally, politically. In our study we focus on urban population of national capital of India. In India diarrhea is reportedly the third largest cause of child mortality and causes a whopping 13% of child deaths each year (NCBI 2015).

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Post Earning Announcement Drift and Behavioural Finance: A literature Review

Author : Mr Vishal B. Gaikwad, Dr. K. S. Reddy

WHO (2008) states that 10% of the total global burden of diseases can be averted by making sanitation, water and hygiene related improvements including 1.4 million avertable diarrheal deaths every year. Highest burden of such diseases falls upon less developed nations. While it is important to quantify the burden of disease, it is also crucial to understand what factors lead to such prevalent use of open defecation and improper hygiene. Such factors may vary geographically, culturally, politically. In our study we focus on urban population of national capital of India. In India diarrhea is reportedly the third largest cause of child mortality and causes a whopping 13% of child deaths each year (NCBI 2015).

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